The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine – Cure Keeping

INTRODUCTION 

The World Health Organization (WHO) has approved certain vaccines for use in its 194 member states, including the United States and all other nations. 

This list of approved covered vaccines is listed below along with how much it will cost you to get your health care provider to administer them to you. This list will be updated periodically as new vaccines become available and old ones are taken off the list. For more information on any of these vaccines or to find out if they are right for you, consult your local health care provider.

The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine


Lits of the Approved Covered Vaccine

A Complete Guide to the 2018 CDC Covered Immunization Schedule
Hepatitis B (HepB)
Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis (DTaP)
Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib)
Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
Inactivated Poliovirus (IPV)
Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)
Meningococcal Conjugate (MCV4 or MenACWY)
Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV13 or Prevnar 13)
Rotavirus – RotaTeq® Vaccine Composition, Synonyms & Pictures

A Complete Guide to the 2018 CDC Covered Immunization Schedule


CDC’s recommended schedule lists every vaccine an infant, child, or teen should get—from birth through 18 years old. 
If you have a change in your insurance or move to a new state, be sure to check out the CDC website for updated vaccines and schedules! You can find additional information on each vaccine at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/easy-to-read/. Your doctor will tell you what shots your child needs as they grow up and depending on their age, but these are current recommendations based on best practices. 

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) is a panel of immunization experts from around the country who review scientific evidence about vaccines regularly.

The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine


Hepatitis B (HepB)

Hepatitis B is a viral infection that can cause serious long-term health problems, including chronic liver disease and cancer. 

The best way to prevent hepatitis B is through vaccination, which will also help protect you from other types of hepatitis. 

HepB vaccine is included in a combination shot (called Pediarix) with DTap (for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis) and IPV (for polio). This shot is given during infancy as part of routine vaccinations but your child may also need to get a dose at school starting at kindergarten or first grade if he/she didn’t receive it as an infant.


The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine



Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis (DTaP)

This vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, which are severe bacterial infections that can cause breathing problems, heart failure and death. 

It is a combination of five different vaccines in one shot. Newborns should receive it at two months and four months; children ages four to six should get a booster shot every five years. 

It is safe for pregnant women to have it but they should talk with their doctor first if possible. Kids who have already had DTap will only need one more shot if they aren’t up-to-date on their vaccinations. People who are allergic to yeast or any other vaccine ingredients can’t take DTap either.


The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine



Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib)

The Hib vaccine is an injection that protects against a type of bacteria that causes meningitis, pneumonia and infections of heart valves. It’s usually given to babies aged 6 weeks, 3 months and 5 months. It should also be administered at any time during childhood if there is a risk of contracting it later on in life, for example in daycare or school. 

The most common side effects include fever and/or mild swelling, redness or pain where you get the injection. Other potential adverse reactions are listed below in ‘More info’. Although rare, some people can experience negative reactions after being vaccinated with a Hib vaccine so if you notice unusual symptoms following your immunization it’s best to contact your doctor as soon as possible.


The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine



Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

Human papillomavirus is a virus that can cause genital warts, cervical cancer and cancer in other areas. There are currently nine vaccines on The World Health Organization approved covered vaccine list to prevent seven HPV infections. 

These vaccines are given in three doses over six months (see recommended schedules for each country). 

The countries with recommendations for human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization include Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland (see details here), Italy (recommendations under review), Israel (see details here), Japan and Norway. More than 140 million people in one hundred countries have been vaccinated against human papillomavirus infection through public-sector programs.


The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine


Inactivated Poliovirus (IPV)

The inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) was developed by Albert Sabin and Maurice Hilleman in 1955. In addition to causing polio, wild-type poliovirus can cause aseptic meningitis. 

The live oral polio vaccine is contraindicated for immunocompromised individuals due to the increased risk of paralytic polio infection and aseptic meningitis caused by wild-type virus. Another advantage of IPV over OPV is that it induces antibodies that cross-protect against infection with types 1, 2, and 3.


The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine



Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

This combination vaccine protects against three different diseases. Measles causes a full-body rash, nausea, and fever; it can be deadly in some rare cases. 

Mumps causes painful swelling of glands near your ears, mouth, and jaw; if it spreads to your brain it can cause permanent damage. Rubella (aka German measles) is relatively mild, but if you catch it early in pregnancy you can give birth to a child with serious defects. 

This vaccine is usually administered in one dose at 12–15 months old and again before school entry around 4–6 years old. One important note: all vaccinations are typically not given together during one visit; vaccines are administered over time for best results.


The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine



Meningococcal Conjugate (MCV4 or MenACWY)

This vaccine is given to children 11 to 12 years old and adults 19 to 59 years old. It protects against four different types of meningococcal disease (A, C, W, and Y). A booster shot is recommended at age 16 for people at increased risk for getting meningococcal disease. 

This includes people who live in dormitories or other crowded settings, like military barracks. Meningococcal conjugate vaccines have been given in a series of shots that are usually administered with other vaccines (like measles/mumps/rubella [MMR] or tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis [Tdap]). Tdap vaccine can also be used to complete a series started with MCV4.


The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine



Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV13 or Prevnar 13)

The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) protects against 13 strains of Streptococcus pneumonia bacteria, which can cause pneumonia, meningitis and other invasive diseases. PCV13 is given to children younger than 2 years old, with a booster given at age 5. 

It was recommended for universal use in young children by The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) in 2000 and is recommended for children older than 2 years if they have underlying health conditions that put them at high risk of infection. It’s also recommended for pregnant women as part of routine care during pregnancy as well as anyone over age 65 who has not already received it or been exposed to certain serotypes of pneumococcal bacteria.


The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine



Rotavirus – RotaTeq® Vaccine Composition, Synonyms & Pictures

1-(2-O-Deoxy-D-Ribofuranosyl)-5-[P-D-Mannopyranosyl-(1→4)-0-D-Glucofuranosyl Ntetraose with a monosaccharide equivalent weight of 5060.35 g/mol, CAS number 938056-18–7. RotaTeq® is a tetravalent vaccine indicated for active immunization against rotavirus gastroenteritis caused by serotypes G1, G2, G3 and G4 (in order of decreasing severity). The vaccine is supplied as a sterile, freeze-dried powder in 10 vials each containing 1 dose or 100 doses per vial. For…


The World Health Organization Approved Covered Vaccine


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