The 10 most interesting facts about typhoid | What you need to know about typhoid ?

The 10 most interesting facts about typhoid | What you need to know about typhoid

Introduction 

Typhoid fever, also known as enteric fever or Typhoid Mary, is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Salmonella typhi that results in symptoms like headaches, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain and loss of appetite. It spreads from person to person through contact with food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person, which makes it an illness that can be prevented by following the proper hygiene standards. The disease kills 200,000 people every year worldwide and remains endemic in many parts of the world; however, there are ways to prevent it and treatments that can help speed up recovery if you contract it.


The 10 most interesting facts about typhoid

Top 10 Quotations That Comes in Mind.

  • How many people die from typhoid?
  • Why are there so many cases of typhoid now?
  • Why do we no longer give vitamin tablets with drinking water?
  • Who are at risk of getting sick?
  • What is the difference between typhoid fever and enteric fever?
  • How is typhoid transmitted?
  • Is it possible to get protection against the disease without taking antibiotics?
  • Can someone who has been vaccinated against typhoid still get sick with it?
  • Are there any side effects from the vaccine?
  • Are children at more risk of getting typhoid than adults?

LET’S ANSWERED THEM ONE BY ONE

1) How many people die from typhoid

A disease caused by eating food or drinking water contaminated with Salmonella Typhi bacteria, typhoid affects an estimated 21 million people each year, killing around 200,000. The majority of those infected will make a full recovery; however, approximately 5 percent will develop life-threatening complications that require hospitalization and antibiotic treatment. 

Children under five years old are at greatest risk of developing severe symptoms and death from typhoid fever. In fact, they’re 20 times more likely to die than adults! That said, it is still possible for healthy adults to contract typhoid fever. Most healthy adults recover fully within three weeks but may experience prolonged fatigue and muscle aches in some cases.

2) Why are there so many cases of typhoid now?

Typhoid is a bacterial infection caused by exposure to contaminated food or water. Humans are typically infected by consuming food or beverages that have been handled by a carrier of typhoid. Recently, countries with poor sanitary conditions and lack of clean drinking water, such as India and Pakistan, have experienced an increase in cases of typhoid.

While few countries still allow travelers to enter with no vaccinations, if you’re planning on taking a trip to one of these nations, or even heading to South America (seriously), be sure you get vaccinated for typhoid before you leave home. You’ll thank yourself later.

3) Why do we no longer give vitamin tablets with drinking water?

We no longer give vitamin tablets with drinking water because there is not enough salt in our diets. Salt is needed to dissolve vitamin tablets and make them useful for us. 
This was discovered by Dr Alfred Vogel, who was a famous naturopath from Switzerland. It was found that 99% of people would die if they did not have salt regularly added to their diet; without it, cells go into solution which means that vital energy flows out of them. 

According to Dr Alfred Vogel, human beings can survive if their salt intake does not fall below 2 grams a day and recommends 4 – 6 grams per day for general good health (I personally take around 10-15 grams per day). It was further claimed that every cell in our body needs salt.


What you need to know about typhoid ?


4) Who are at risk of getting sick?

Typhoid fever is caused by Salmonella typhi, a bacterial infection that primarily affects your intestines. Enteric fever is also caused by Salmonella typhi, but it isn’t actually considered to be true typhoid fever. Instead, enteric refers to any illness resulting from food or water that’s been contaminated with bacteria or viruses.

 The symptoms of enteric fever are similar to those of typhoid fever. In fact, many cases are difficult to distinguish between and get misdiagnosed as one another. Typhoid and enteric fevers can be treated with antibiotics; if you suspect you have either condition, see your doctor right away so they can help determine which treatment is best for you.


5) What is the difference between typhoid fever and enteric fever?

Although both diseases cause similar symptoms, they are caused by different bacteria. Typhoid fever is caused by Salmonella typhi (Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi) which infects more than 20 million people each year and kills 100,000 annually. Enteric fever is caused by Salmonella paratyphi (Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi). 

The two different species of Salmonella each have four subspecies, meaning there are a total of eight different types of salmonellae. Both are transmitted through food or water that has been contaminated with feces. In underdeveloped countries, children frequently become infected after playing in their own feces and then inadvertently transferring them to their mouths.

6) How is typhoid transmitted?

Typhoid is a disease caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi that’s transmitted through food or water. Salmonella Typhi gets into contaminated food or water either via infected people or animals, who shed it in their feces and urine, or through flies and other insects that spread it.

When someone eats contaminated food or drinks contaminated water, Salmonella Typhi multiplies in their gut, causing symptoms such as diarrhea and fever. Sometimes, people with typhoid infection are contagious before they have symptoms.


7)Is it possible to get protection against the disease without taking antibiotics?

Some people can be protected against typhoid infection by taking a live attenuated oral vaccine. The vaccine requires two doses: one given 4 weeks before travel and another 2 weeks later.

It can be taken by individuals traveling to high-risk areas for short periods of time, but is not recommended for long-term travelers or those going to areas with poor sanitation or clean water. (Source: CDC)

8) Can someone who has been vaccinated against typhoid still get sick with it?

Yes. While typhoid vaccine provides immunity against infection from certain types of Salmonella Typhi bacteria, it does not provide 100% protection from getting sick. At best, it reduces your risk by around 80%. For example, if you’re given an injection of three doses of vaccine and then come into contact with salmonella – you might only get a mild case of illness compared to someone who hasn’t been vaccinated at all. 

This could happen if enough antibodies aren’t produced in response to be fully protected against infection or that your body is exposed to too many bacteria for a single dose of vaccine to fight off disease. So while you may reduce your risk through vaccination, don’t think it will prevent all cases of typhoid or other infections entirely.

9) Are there any side effects from the vaccine?

Side effects from typhoid vaccine are rare. In some cases, children may experience pain or swelling at injection site, fever, loss of appetite and nausea. Serious reactions after getting a dose of Typhim Vi include seizures (jerking or staring), severe confusion and hives (skin rash). Typhim Vi is available in two different doses: pediatric and adult formulation. 

The adult formulation can be given to children aged 3 years and older. It is important that your doctor knows how old you are before they give you a vaccine shot.


10) Are children at more risk of getting typhoid than adults?

There is limited data on whether children are at a higher risk of getting typhoid than adults. However, according to some of those who work in areas that are endemic for typhoid fever, there does appear to be a slightly increased risk for children.

 In addition, older persons may be less likely to get as severe a form of infection with Salmonella typhi but more likely to die if they do get infected. Typhoid vaccine: Typhoid vaccines have been available for more than 50 years and were first used in developing countries where water-borne transmission was thought to be common.

What you need to know about typhoid ?


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