10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer | World Health Organization Referred | Cure Keeping

 INTRODUCTION

Cancer affects millions of people every year and causes a lot of death and suffering. The good news is that the early detection of cancer greatly increases your chances of survival. 

Here are 10 ways to spot the signs of cancer, so you can be sure to have yourself checked as soon as possible if you think something might be wrong with you.


10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer | World Health Organization Referred | Cure Keeping


Here Are The 10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer

1) Change in bowel/bladder habits
2) Pain anywhere in your body
3) Sores that won’t heal
4) New lumps or growths on skin
5) Changes in gums, lips, or tongue
6) Extreme fatigue
7) Headaches or blurred vision
8) Nausea and vomiting
9) Persistent cough or hoarseness
10) Unexplained weight loss or gain

1) Change in bowel/bladder habits

One of the most common early symptoms of colorectal cancer is a change in bowel/bladder habits, such as pain or bleeding. It’s possible that these symptoms are caused by other things, such as hemorrhoids or diverticulitis, but they’re still important to mention to your doctor. If you have unexplained constipation or diarrhea—especially if it doesn’t go away—it may be time for a checkup. 

Also pay attention if you feel bloated all day long or find that your stools are narrower than usual and hard to pass. Abdominal pain that’s persistent, recurrent or different from previous stomach aches could also signal colon cancer. Consult your physician if any of these symptoms persist; colorectal cancer is highly treatable when caught early.




2) Pain anywhere in your body

If you have a constant pain somewhere in your body, especially one that doesn’t go away after a few days or weeks, it could be cancer. 

It could also be something else, so don’t panic—just talk to your doctor about it. But remember: sometimes cancer isn’t painful at all. For example, breast cancers can develop without causing any symptoms until they grow big enough and press on surrounding tissues or organs. 

And a colonoscopy screening done regularly might catch rectal cancers before they become painful. So if you notice anything odd in your body or are having pains or discomfort that won’t go away, see your doctor as soon as possible. Early detection is key to successful treatment for most types of cancer.


10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer - cure keeping


3) Sores that won’t heal

If you have a sore on your body that doesn’t seem to heal, schedule an appointment with your doctor. It could be a sign of non-melanoma skin cancer. 

Pay attention to any other changes in your skin; melanomas can appear anywhere on your body and even a small change in size or color is reason for concern. 

According to research from Johns Hopkins University, people who get their moles checked regularly are more likely to find them early enough for successful treatment. 

Melanoma is rare, but it’s also often treatable if diagnosed early enough; in fact, many cases of melanoma that are found early respond well and can be cured by excision (removal) alone. Early detection is key!


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4) New lumps or growths on skin

Anything new on your skin should be checked out by a doctor. Although skin lumps are often benign, they could signify melanoma or another dangerous form of skin cancer. If you discover something unusual on your body, see a physician to make sure it’s nothing serious. 

There are many skin conditions that can resemble more serious forms of skin cancer; making an appointment with a dermatologist is always recommended when you notice anything new or unusual on your body. 

Be aware: Changes in moles (or even freckles) are not necessarily due to skin cancer — but if you notice changes in their shape, size, color or any other difference from normal then it’s best to make an appointment with a doctor so that he or she can check it out and reassure you.

10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer | World Health Organization Referred



5) Changes in gums, lips, or tongue

If you’re noticing changes in your gums, lips, or tongue—like soreness or bleeding—visit your dentist. These can be warning signs that you might have oral cancer. Do it for yourself: You should get regular checkups at least once a year. 

And remember, you are more likely to get breast and skin cancers if there is a family history of these diseases. Know what’s normal for you: Many breast changes don’t mean cancer—but knowing what is normal for your breasts will help you spot changes that need medical attention. 

For example, most women experience swelling or tenderness in their breasts before their period every month. But when you find an abnormality with your breast (that doesn’t go away with a warm compress), see your doctor right away. 

Stay up-to-date on exams: The best way to prevent many types of cancer from appearing is to be screened regularly for them.


10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer | World Health Organization Referred



6) Extreme fatigue

One sign that something might be wrong is a sudden increase in exhaustion. This could be a sign that your body isn’t functioning properly, says Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., an oncologist at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center—Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. 

He offers some simple tests: Ask yourself how quickly you recover from exercise, whether any physical activity seems hard when it previously didn’t, or if you are getting enough sleep (at least six hours for most adults). 
Also pay attention to your stress levels; high stress can lead to fatigue and illness too. You should also think about what’s been going on with your health lately, even going back as far as three months. 

Think about whether there was a time where you were feeling generally under-the-weather but had no specific diagnosis. That’s a possible red flag. Most people would agree that unexplained symptoms do need further investigation, Dr. Rosenberg says.


10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer | World Health Organization Referred



7) Headaches or blurred vision

This symptom is associated with a number of cancers, including breast and prostate. Keep an eye out for persistent headaches that could indicate a brain tumor or other neurological problems. 

Also watch for blurred vision, which can signal a retinal detachment in your eye. The good news? Both are highly treatable if detected early enough. Speak with your doctor if you’re experiencing these symptoms and have been diagnosed with cancer. 

You may be eligible for treatment assistance programs through drug companies or government agencies such as Medicare; these programs may help you pay for medication that’s not typically covered by insurance plans (including prescriptions, co-pays and deductibles). Check out organizations like CancerCare and CoPatient for more information on support groups and resources.


10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer | World Health Organization Referred



8) Nausea and vomiting

While nausea and vomiting are common symptoms, they can be caused by a number of serious medical conditions. In particular, they can signal appendicitis, gallbladder disease or pancreatitis—all of which should be promptly evaluated by a doctor. 
Your next step is finding out if your abdominal pain is related to your gut. Nausea and vomiting often occur with stomach issues like gastroenteritis (an infection in your gut) or gastritis (inflammation in your stomach). 
They may also result from gastrointestinal obstructions like constipation, blood clots or even tumors that block normal bowel movement. But there’s another type of obstruction that could be behind your nausea: airway obstruction. Learn more about warning signs of airway obstruction.
It’s not always easy to know when you need to see a doctor. But in many cases, it’s critical—especially when you feel different or just aren’t feeling right. 
Talking to your primary care physician (PCP) at each stage along the way will help ensure you have all the information you need to get yourself better quickly and prevent more serious problems down the road .
 Here are 10 important things for men 50 years old and over to ask their doctors about: 
1. How effective is my treatment? What else might I try? 
2. Should I keep doing what I’m doing, or switch my plan? 
3. What can I do at home to help myself get better faster? 
4. Should I talk with anyone else—like a counselor, dietitian or psychologist—about any concerns or problems right now or in the future? 
5. Are there changes I can make in how much activity I do every day that would improve how I feel and how quickly I recover from illness or injury? 
6. What new medications should I avoid, if any? 
7. What can I do right now to reduce my risk for a heart attack and stroke down the road? 
8. What if we find a problem—like early prostate cancer—during our visit today? 
9. How will you know if my treatment is working, and when might we need more tests or have another discussion about my condition? 
10. Is there anything else you’d like me to consider as part of my long-term health plan that we didn’t talk about today? (HelpGuide) 
If a doctor does make a diagnosis of cancer, she may also provide suggestions for your diet and lifestyle changes as well as tips for addressing anxiety during what can be an emotional time. 
The emotional side effects of prostate cancer treatment—including depression—are real issues, especially among older men undergoing hormonal therapies. Experts estimate that between 25 percent and 50 percent of all men with prostate cancer report symptoms that fall under clinical definitions for depressive disorders such as major depression or dysthymia. 
Some other psychological factors associated with prostate disease include: denial; powerlessness; anxiety; anger; guilt; loss/grief; difficulty coping with sexual concerns and body image changes because of treatments such as surgery or radiation.
10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer | World Health Organization Referred

9) Persistent cough or hoarseness

If you find yourself frequently coughing or clearing your throat, it could be a sign that there’s something wrong. Frequent coughing can often be a sign of lung cancer or asthma. If it’s accompanied by shortness of breath, persistent pain in your chest, or blood in your phlegm, get to a doctor as soon as possible. 
He’ll either determine what’s causing your cough and see how best to treat it or give you an x-ray that reveals any growths—and hopefully lets you begin treatment early enough for them not to spread further.
10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer | World Health Organization Referred

10) Unexplained weight loss or gain

It may seem like weight loss or gain should be something you notice right away. But, in reality, it’s often more gradual. If someone has been experiencing significant weight change for a month or longer—especially if there are other symptoms accompanying it—they should see a doctor. Weight changes can be due to thyroid issues, digestive conditions, illnesses (such as infections and diabetes), medications, and hormonal imbalances. 
They also might indicate a metabolic issue such as Cushing’s syndrome. Someone who is losing weight or gaining may have only one tumor; many tumors will cause serious alterations in health over time. So don’t ignore these warning signs that indicate serious underlying problems: They need medical attention from professionals who know how to diagnose and treat them properly. 
As a side note, most people worry about possible breast lumps but neglect their thyroid gland: This tiny butterfly-shaped gland on your neck also requires your attention if you suspect health issues — especially if there’s unexplained rapid weight loss (more than 10 pounds) — as an indication of thyroid cancer or hypothyroidism. How do they differ? When is treatment needed?
10 Ways to Spot the Signs of Cancer | World Health Organization Referred

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