10 strange illnesses and injuries you might have seen in the ER

TOP 10 STRANGE ILLNESSES AND INJURIES YOU MIGHT HAVE SEEN IN THE ER..

10 strange illnesses and injuries you might have seen in the ER

What Actually I Mean to Say !

The emergency room is the place that any injury or illness, no matter how strange or obscure, will eventually make its way to. We’ve seen it all over the years – we’ve had patients who have swallowed their teeth and we’ve seen people with injuries caused by lizards on the loose! 
We’ve seen so many illnesses and injuries that we thought it would be interesting to bring together some of the more common ones in this article – check out our list of strange illnesses and injuries that you might see in the ER, complete with first-hand accounts from our staff here at Boston Medical Center!

Here I’ll Discuss Top 10 Topics in This Blog so You Can Better Understand. Have a Look to the Topics Which I’ll Discuss.

1) Head trauma
2) Broken bones
3) Severe pain
4) Intestinal issues
5) Something in your eye
6) A headache that won’t go away
7) Chest pain
8) Infections
9) Amputations
10) Seizures

NOW !! Time to understood what are these..

1) Head trauma

Damage to your brain from trauma can result in all sorts of complications. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to post-traumatic epilepsy, or epilepsy that occurs after TBI—which is much more common than other types of seizures due to TBI.

 Despite what some people think, it’s not actually possible for a seizure to cause brain damage (that’s why most seizures don’t require emergency care). After any kind of head trauma, however, it’s always a good idea to get checked out by a doctor. The doctor will probably want an MRI or CT scan right away to rule out any sort of internal bleeding or fractures.

Head trauma

2) Broken bones

Not to be confused with a fracture, which is a break in a bone that protrudes through your skin, an undisplaced broken bone can be more difficult to diagnose. These fractures (or breaks) occur within bones but don’t break any skin or move around. 

To find out if you’ve broken something like a finger or rib, go see your doctor as soon as possible. They’ll take x-rays to make sure that no bone is poking through your skin (that’s how they’ll tell if it’s actually fractured or just broken), then put it in a cast for healing. As scary as seeing an x-ray of your injured finger looks, don’t let it scare you away from seeing your doctor—taking care of yourself when injured is important!

Broken bones

3) Severe pain

Aching joints, muscles, bones, or teeth can be caused by a variety of conditions. Sometimes there is an obvious cause for your pain such as a pulled muscle or strained joint, but many times there is no real known cause. Pain can also stem from psychological problems such as depression or anxiety that can make pain feel worse than it really is. 

It’s important to know that once your body has healed from an injury you are still susceptible to getting hurt again just like anyone else. If a situation seems too stressful, take time out to relax and unwind before dealing with it head on if possible.

Severe pain



4) Intestinal issues

The anatomy of your intestinal tract isn’t a subject that comes up during most job interviews, but when it does, if you have a better idea what to expect, it can make for an interesting conversation.

 The human gut is home to trillions of bacteria—that’s trillions with a T—and these tiny microbes perform all sorts of functions from digesting food and absorbing nutrients to fighting infections. Sometimes they also cause health problems. In fact, disorders affecting your gut affect nearly everyone at some point.

 Intestinal illness is common and includes everything from constipation to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to diverticulitis. Understanding what’s normal can help prevent major health concerns down the road.

Intestinal issues

5) Something in your eye

If your eyelid is stuck together, or if there’s a foreign object wedged under it, apply slight pressure to open your eye. If it’s swollen shut, put ice on it for 10 minutes, then try opening your eye. If that doesn’t work, take an over-the-counter pain reliever like ibuprofen and call your doctor. 

Your vision will usually return to normal as long as you don’t leave any chemicals or sharp objects in your eye for too long. In rare cases, surgery is needed to remove contact lenses that get stuck in your eyes.

Something in your eye

6) A headache that won’t go away

This condition is referred to as chronic daily headache or CDH, which is a bit of a misnomer since these headaches are not daily. In fact, they occur from several times per week to several times per month. CDH often starts during childhood or early adulthood and affects one out of five people with migraine.

 People with migraines are two to three times more likely than others to develop CDH, especially if they suffer from abdominal migraine or frequent migraine episodes (more than 12 attacks per month). Individuals who take medication overuse headache (MOH) may also develop CDH. 

The headaches associated with MOH also tend to be more severe than migraines without medication overuse.

A headache that won’t go away

7) Chest pain

The most common cause of chest pain is heartburn. Other causes include angina, aortic dissection, muscle spasms, anxiety attacks or heart arrhythmias. Chest pain can sometimes also be caused by lung issues such as pleurisy (inflammation of one or both lungs) and pneumonia (infection in one or both lungs). 

This type of chest pain may be accompanied by shortness of breath, fever, fatigue and coughing. Chest pain should always be investigated for a heart condition if it occurs unexpectedly or with unusual symptoms such as fainting or nausea. Otherwise it is usually caused by non-life threatening conditions.

Chest pain

8) Infections

Bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites all have ways of getting into your body, but when they succeed, it’s not always a bad thing. Many infections are actually good for us—at least for our immune systems.

 When an infection enters your body, white blood cells rush to where it has taken hold in order to attack and destroy it. Sometimes though we can get too much of a good thing; some immune responses can lead to autoimmune diseases like diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis. These occur when white blood cells attack parts of our own bodies instead of attacking foreign invaders.

Infections

9) Amputations

This is a common injury, which can be caused by everything from cars to lawnmowers. Amputations are among some of the most life-changing injuries someone can suffer. The best way to prevent amputation is by making sure that all tools and equipment used around your home are up to date. 

When working with power tools or yard equipment, make sure that safety precautions are being taken on a regular basis. Additionally, it’s important to use protective gear such as goggles, ear plugs and more when necessary.

 While these items may feel cumbersome or uncomfortable at first, they could save your limbs from serious damage down the road! Keep reading for another strange but true fact about medical care!

Amputations



10) Seizures

The result of brain activity that’s uncontrolled or firing abnormally, epileptic seizures can be caused by a variety of factors such as brain tumors, traumatic brain injury, poisoning and low blood sugar. Symptoms vary widely depending on what part of your brain is affected—if it’s your frontal lobe, for example, you may experience loss of consciousness or a sense that everything around you is moving very slowly. 

To reduce your risk of having an epileptic seizure, seek medical help if a seizure lasts longer than five minutes; take anti-seizure medication as prescribed; drink plenty of water to stay hydrated; and avoid alcohol.

Seizures


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