10 Facts About Dengue You Should Know | Treatment | Cure Keeping

10 Facts About Dengue You Should Know


INTRODUCTION

Dengue fever, also known as dengue hemorrhagic fever, is caused by any one of four related viruses in the genus Flavivirus. There are four distinct types of dengue virus—DV1, DV2, DV3 and DV4. 

The type of virus involved determines the course of the disease and the severity of its symptoms. Dengue affects more than 390 million people each year and an estimated 50 million people get sick each year with over 500,000 hospitalizations and an estimated 12,500 deaths worldwide.


Here Are The List Of These Facts…

1) What is dengue?
2) Dengue symptoms
3) How to treat it?
4) Can you prevent it?
5) Who are at risk of contracting dengue?
6) How many people die from it every year?
7) Do you need medical help if your child has contracted dengue?
8) How does the disease affect pregnant women?
9) Methods used in diagnosing infections related to this disease
10) Is there a way out of this dangerous disease without medication?


1) What is dengue?

Dengue fever, also known as break bone fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), is a virus that causes an influenza-like illness. It is spread by infected mosquitoes. The symptoms of dengue include severe headache, pain behind the eyes, a runny nose and a rash. In some cases, people develop internal bleeding and low blood pressure, which can lead to death if not treated. 

The incubation period for dengue ranges from three to 14 days following infection. There are four strains of dengue — DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4.


10 Facts About Dengue You Should Know

2) Dengue symptoms

Typically, a dengue infection is marked by two different phases. The first phase—the prodromal or pre-eruptive phase—is characterized by mild to moderate flu-like symptoms such as fever, joint and muscle pains, headaches, and rashes. 

These symptoms typically subside after a few days. After an incubation period of 3 to 14 days (sometimes longer), comes phase two: The eruptive phase in which people experience nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, blurry vision, difficulty breathing or shortness of breath and enlargement of the liver and spleen.


10 Facts About Dengue You Should Know

3) How to treat it?

While there is no cure for dengue, anti-viral medication can help prevent complications. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends paracetamol to relieve mild pain and fever, while ibuprofen may be given to reduce fever in adults and children older than six months who have a high fever or those with pain or rashes. 

If you have a high fever that lasts longer than three days or a rash, contact your doctor immediately. In its severe form, dengue hemorrhagic fever can cause low blood pressure and organ failure; if you experience signs of anemia like dizziness or pale skin, seek emergency medical attention as soon as possible.


10 Facts About Dengue You Should Know


4) Can you prevent it?

Yes. The best way to protect yourself from dengue is to avoid mosquito bites by using repellents, wearing protective clothing and reducing your exposure to mosquitoes. If you travel to a region where dengue is prevalent, take precautions while outdoors—including avoiding outdoor activities during peak mosquito hours (dusk and dawn). 

For travelers who will be in areas with risk of exposure for more than one week, you should also be vaccinated against yellow fever at least 10 days before departure.

There are currently no vaccines or specific medications available for dengue prevention or treatment. A new vaccine has been recently developed by Sanofi Pasteur which will soon be tested on humans.


10 Facts About Dengue You Should Know

5) Who are at risk of contracting dengue?

Dengue is a tropical virus that infects up to 100 million people a year in more than 100 countries. Although many recover fully, others develop a potentially lethal complication called severe dengue or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). DHF can occur when your immune system is weakened by viral infections such as influenza and upper respiratory tract infections. 

The condition requires immediate medical attention and often requires hospitalization. Travelers to areas of Asia, Africa, Latin America and Australia are most at risk; however, outbreaks have occurred in parts of California due to tourists who contracted dengue abroad and brought it back with them.


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6) How many people die from it every year?

Every year, around 50 million people get sick with dengue, and around 20,000 die from it. It’s not just a third-world disease: The World Health Organization estimates that around 80 percent of dengue cases are found in countries with high per capita income. 
If you’re living in such a country—and especially if you’re traveling to one—knowing about dengue is crucial for your health. There are things you can do to protect yourself. 
This post lists 10 things you should know about how dengue is transmitted, how it affects adults versus children, what symptoms might tell doctors that something else has happened and more.
7 Ways Dengue Affects Adults Differently Than Children : Adults who contract dengue tend to fare worse than children; hospitalization rates are much higher among adults than children (30 percent compared with 6 percent). 
Scientists aren’t exactly sure why adults seem more susceptible to severe forms of the illness; as many as 40 percent show signs of bleeding below the skin while they have their fevers, which sometimes lead them into comas or result in death.
10 Facts About Dengue You Should Know

7) Do you need medical help if your child has contracted dengue?

Yes. If you live in a tropical or subtropical area where dengue fever is common, don’t try to self-diagnose your child’s symptoms. Visit a doctor right away, even if you are worried that he might not have contracted dengue. 
It’s also smart to see a doctor as soon as possible if someone who lives with you experiences any of these symptoms. Symptoms usually develop three to 14 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito and may include: fever, joint pain, muscle pain, headaches, vomiting and rash. The discomfort can be very intense at times and there is no specific treatment for it. 
The illness can last from four to 10 days without causing long-term problems, but it could lead to severe complications including death. The sooner you receive treatment, however, the better off you will be in terms of recovering quickly. 
On average, dengue infection lasts six days before going into remission on its own — but those first few days can be really tough on patients.
10 Facts About Dengue You Should Know

8) How does the disease affect pregnant women?

Pregnant women infected with dengue are at greater risk of severe disease and premature labor. Also, if they were infected while carrying twins, both babies are more likely to be born with microcephaly (an abnormally small head). 
It’s important for women to know that, according to recent research, it is safe for them to use anti-mosquito products while pregnant. Zika infection is dangerous in early pregnancy because it has been linked to an increase in microcephaly cases and other birth defects when a woman is infected during her first trimester; however there’s no such evidence for dengue virus.
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9) Methods used in diagnosing infections related to this disease

There are several types of tests that may be used to diagnose dengue. These include: Antibody test – This test measures antibodies in your blood to determine if you have ever been infected with dengue virus. 
It can show both recent and past infections but not active infection. NS1 antigen test – This test detects an antigen produced by a certain strain of dengue virus in your blood. Since it takes up to four weeks for antibodies to form after infection, but only two days for production of antigens, there is a window during which it is difficult to detect an active infection using antibody tests alone.
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10) Is there a way out of this dangerous disease without medication?

Although Dengue is a serious illness, in most cases people recover completely with bed rest and a good diet. The most important thing is not to panic: many patients say that when they were ill, just knowing that it wasn’t something worse like malaria made them feel much better. 
The following tips are for those who want to do everything possible to avoid dengue fever but without taking medication. 
Some of these things may seem obvious but there’s nothing wrong with re-emphasizing these points as prevention is better than cure! When traveling in areas where dengue fever can be found, follow these simple steps: 
Step:1. Avoid all mosquito bites by using insect repellent on exposed skin and wear light-colored long sleeves; 
Step:2. Sleep under mosquito nets impregnated with permethrin or pyrethrum (which kill insects); 
Step:3. Sleep outside (without air conditioning) or use an electric fan; 
Step:4. If you have had a fever lasting more than 24 hours, see your doctor immediately ; 
Step:5. If symptoms occur within two weeks after returning from a country where dengue is known to exist, see your doctor immediately .
Step:6. If your work environment doesn’t allow for being away from work for even a day, consider reducing stress and having plenty of extra energy available by making some lifestyle changes such as exercising three times per week. 
At the same time maintain healthy eating habits avoiding junk food and sugary drinks . Reducing stress levels has been proven to improve our ability to deal with life events so don’t take it lightly.
10 Facts About Dengue You Should Know | Treatment | Cure Keeping

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